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Adverse Medical Events Outside the Hospital

submitted by: admin on 05/08/2015
Most clinical trials assessing adverse medical events (AMEs) have focused on inpatient care. Now there's a study looking at AMEs in private practice and it shows that the numbers are about the same. Most AMEs are from surgeries, diagnostic testing, and treatment errors. Every year there are about 11,000 paid malpractice suits that represent the tip of the...

Antidepressants Increase Mortality in ICU Patients

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  A Harvard study in May of 2012 reviewed the records of more than 10,000 patients admitted to the ICU and found that if they were on antidepressants that their risk of dying was 73% higher. They also found that 17% of these patients were on SSRI or SNRI antidepressants! This risk remained elevated for one year after discharge. People with acute coronary...

Back Pain: Initial Treatment

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
Back pain is very common and there are many styles of practice that can help get rid of it. It pays to consider a wide range of therapies before choosing a treatment, especially if there is a serious disability. Initial treatment can include ice, DMSO, arnica, arnica, acupuncture, massage, Alexander, Feldenkrais, infrared light therapy are all approaches that...

Better Pain Management Can Shorten Hospital Stays

submitted by: admin on 09/22/2013
  An article in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in September of 2013 documented that pain relief after surgery from a local anesthetic in the region of the surgical scar led to earlier discharges. Patients going home the soonest after surgery had the lowest re-admission rates. While injecting a local anesthetic into the...

Breast Cancer and MRIs

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
MRIs overdiagnose cancer but are too sensitive to be used as a primary screening tool, however, they are useful in assessing the extent of a cancer, once it is identified. They are costly but do not have radiation.      

Can Surgery Bring on Alzheimer's Disease?

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
  Many of our seniors having surgery suffer cognitive loss and the question that often comes up is does the anesthesia or surgery itself cause the problem. An article published in the September issue of Annals of Surgery compared the effect of anesthesia alone vs anesthesia plus surgery and showed that in fact the surgery itself is the most potent in...

Cataract Surgery Prevents Hip Fractures

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
  People over age 65 who had cataract surgery had a lower chance of a hip fracture 1 year after the procedure according to an article published in JAMA in August of 2012. Cataracts cause visual changes that result in postural instability and in combination with the loss of strength and loss of bone strength that occurs with aging, this leads to more...

Chiropractic Care Superior to Medical Treatment with Physical Therapy

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
A recent study conducted by medical professionals outside the chiropractic profession concluded that chiropractic care is more effective for common, work-related, low back pain when compard to treatment by a physical therapist of physician. Overall chiropractic patients had lower medical expenses, fewer disability recurrences, and shorter initial periods of disability....

Chronic Pain

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
Half of all Americans have chronic pain that interfere with lifestyle. Back pain is most common. Solutions for pain relief are discussed including prayer! Drug and alcohol addictions are common. OTC drugss are common but are not safe.        

Cutting Edge Treatment for Stroke

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
While having a stroke can be devastating, there are cutting edge strategies that can help a lot more than conventional medical practice that includes physical therapy, anticoagulation, and sometimes surgery. Most strokes are caused by clots from arteriosclerosis or atrial fibrillation or hemorrhage into the brain, but stroke-like conditions such as head trauma,...

Do We Do Too Many Angioplasties and Stents?

submitted by: admin on 09/20/2013
Most angioplasties and stents used to treat acute heart attacks or unstable angina in the US are necessary and lifesaving. We know that these procedures are not indicated for people with coronary artery blockages who are stable; only about 3% benefit from these invasive procedures compared to medical treatment alone using pharmaceutical drugs. There is also a...

Do You Have the Right to Know if a Trainee is Doing Your Surgery?

submitted by: admin on 09/20/2013
  According to a study published in July 2012 Archives of Surgery, only about 25% of eye institutions had a policy of informing patients that residents would be involved in their surgery! The reasoning of these teaching facilities is that it is critical that residents learn how to do surgeries and that if patients were offered the choice of not having...

Elective Surgery and Conflicts of Interest

submitted by: admin on 05/24/2019
How do you know if the doctor that is doing your elective surgery doing what is best for you?  If you were to go to another region, would you find the doctors there would use another method?  If you have breast cancer, how do you know whether you need a mastectomy or a lumpectomy? Dr. Len and Nurse Vicki discuss what you can do to make sure...

Epidural Steroid Injections May Lead to Worse Outcomes

submitted by: admin on 02/20/2015
  According to  the February 2013 issue of the journal, Spine, epidural steroid injections (ESI) often lead to more pain and level of functioning at 4 years. In the short term, ESI can have a profound effect on pain relief. In those eventually going to surgery, compared to those not getting ESI, surgeries were shorter as was hospital stay. While...

Exercise Boosts Immunity Against Cancer

submitted by: admin on 06/25/2016
  Exercising after completing chemotherapy boosts immunity by replacing senescent NK cells with vibrant, healthy NK cells that can fight against the progression of cancer according to an October 2012 article presented at the Integrative Biology of Exercise in October of 2012. This study out of the University of Nebraska studied people who participated...

Exercise Helps Congestive Heart Failure

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  Moderate exercise helps ease depression in patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is also associated with a small reduction in death and hospitalizations. Even the failing heart can be strengthened by exercise as measured by peak oxygen consumption and longer duration of exercise that is done carefully under the supervision of a qualified...

General Anesthesia Can Cause Dementia

submitted by: admin on 09/22/2013
  An article in Annals of Neurology in February of 2012 showed that in mice the anesthetic Forane caused impaired cognitive function that were much like the changes in Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have documented that patients undergoing general anesthesia may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Transient cognitive dysfunction...

Hands of Life, A Healers Journey with Julie Motz

submitted by: admin on 09/22/2013
One's own healing energy and the holistic nature of how we heal. Unearthing our emotional traumas is key to this process and it goes all the way back to fetal life. Anesthesia in many ways is much like fetal life and we have ignored how this 9 month period affects us later in life.

Heart Monitoring During Anesthesia

submitted by: admin on 09/23/2013
Only 35% of anesthesiologists monitor cardiac output during surgery. For high risk surgeries this is dangerous as it is critical to know if adequate oxygenation of tissues is being accomplished. It is critical to know the level of hemoglobin in our red cells, as that determines how much oxygen carrying capacity we have. It is also important to know that enough...

Herniated Disks: Is Surgery Necessary?

submitted by: admin on 05/24/2019
Surgery is not the first approach to consider most of the time for herniated discs as much of the time they spontaneouly heal. The pros and cons of the various styles of treatment are discussed. In a large study the outcomes of surgery vs physical therapy and exercise were identical. Integrative therapies are reviewed.